Why the International Community Made It So Difficult to Prosecute the Crime of Genocide by A. Dirk Moses

PLEASE TAKE ACTION RIGHT NOW AND SEND YOUR LETTER TO THE UN OFFICE OF THE SPECIAL ADVISER ON THE PREVENTION OF GENOCIDE AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT PROSECUTOR.

Today, international law on genocide is working as it was designed to: allowing states to ruthlessly exterminate security threats while making it difficult to apply that law. By the reasoning of international lawyers supporting Israel’s war in Gaza today, there are no limits to the number of Palestinian civilians who can be killed incidentally in the pursuit of Israeli military objectives. To root out the estimated 30,000 Hamas fighters in Gaza, how many Palestinian civilians will die? How many will be wounded? So far, nearly 20,000 Palestinians have been killed, two-thirds of them women and children, and some 50,000 more wounded since Israel launched its military campaign in response to Hamas’s attack on southern Israel on Oct. 7. Israeli military officials claim that they have killed two Palestinian civilians for every Hamas fighter—about 5,000 fighters so far, based on the latest Israeli statements earlier this month. Were that ratio to continue, 60,000 Palestinians would be killed and countless more maimed to “eliminate” Hamas, one of Israel’s stated military goals in Gaza.

Continue reading at https://dawnmena.org/why-the-international-community-made-it-so-difficult-to-prosecute-the-crime-of-genocide/

Israel Charny’s Attack on the Journal of Genocide Research and its Authors: A Response by Amos Goldberg, Thomas J. Kehoe, A. Dirk Moses, Raz Segal, Martin Shaw, and Gerhard Wolf

Please TAKE ACTION RIGHT NOW and send your letter to the UN Office of the Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide and the International Criminal Court Prosecutor.

Obviously, Charny’s main concern, reflecting his commitment to the State of Israel, is with Shaw’s application of the idea of genocide to Palestine. Shaw pointed out that “none of the ‘revisionist’ historians who now dominate the field doubts that deliberate Israeli policies made a substantial contribution to the destruction of the larger part of historical Arab society in Palestine.”
Shaw argued that this was true whether the 1948 removal was the result of Israel’s taking advantage of the “opportunity” to remove it, as Morris continues to argue, or also of extensive “pre-planning,” as Ilan Pappe’s more recent research suggests.41 In this light, Shaw proposed that, within the framework of a broad Lemkinian concept (in terms of which “ethnic cleansing” can be considered genocide), there is “prima facie a strong case for considering the [1948] events partially within a genocide framework.”

Continue reading at https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1436&context=gsp